clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

2022 Draft Prospect Profile: Shane Wright is the consensus top pick

But is he less than a generational talent?

If you buy something from an SB Nation link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics statement.

2022 CHL/NHL Top Prospects Game Photo by Chris Tanouye/Getty Images

It’s that time of year again! We’re less than a month away from the first round of the 2022 NHL Entry Draft, on Thursday, July 7. The Columbus Blue Jackets will be picking at #6 and #12. First up, the consensus #1 overall pick:

Shane Wright

Position: Center
Team: Kingston Frontenacs (OHL)
Date of Birth: January 5, 2004
Birthplace: Burlington, Ontario
Height: 6’0”
Weight: 198 lbs
Shoots: Right

Rankings

Ranked #1 by CONSOLIDATED RANKING
Ranked #1 by ELITEPROSPECTS.COM
Ranked #1 by FCHOCKEY
Ranked #1 by TSN/BOB McKENZIE
Ranked #1 by MCKEEN’S HOCKEY
Ranked #1 by TSN/CRAIG BUTTON
Ranked #1 by NHL CENTRAL SCOUTING (NA Skaters)
Ranked #1 by SPORTSNET
Ranked #2 by ISS HOCKEY
Ranked #1 by RECRUIT SCOUTING
Ranked #1 by DOBBERPROSPECTS
Ranked #1 by DRAFT PROSPECTS HOCKEY
Ranked #1 by SMAHT SCOUTING
Ranked #1 by THE PUCK AUTHORITY

2021-22 Stats

Games Played: 63
Goals: 32
Assists: 62
Points: 94
PIM: 22
Plus/Minus: +23

Shane Wright has been considered the top prospect in this class for several years now, and while that has not changed over the last year, there does seem to be less enthusiasm among some observers. There’s little doubt he can be a very good NHL player, but few expect him to be a McDavid-level generational talent. I think some of the criticism is a bit overblown, however. A common comparison is Patrice Bergeron, and I think any team would consider him worthy of a top pick.

Scouting Reports

Still my top prospect in this class (though no longer in a tier of his own), Wright is an athletic kid who boasts a wide gait and boxy shoulders that balance him over pucks. Those physical tools are complemented by a lethal wrist shot release (which he can get off from several stances and pops off of his blade’s heel or toe) and quick hands in traffic that allow him to take pucks off of the wall and create scoring chances to the interior. He’s also one of the most diligent three-zone players in the draft, with a powerful stride that helps him push play up ice (though its power is more evident the length of the sheet than from a standstill into a quick foot race) when he’s done providing support low in his zone or above the puck. - Scott Wheeler, The Athletic

In short, though he isn’t a generational talent, and he doesn’t have elite individual attributes, he is above average in most categories. What puts him as a first overall pick is the combination of his tools with his elite positioning and hockey IQ, giving him a great probability of success in the NHL.

It’s hard to point to anything Wright does as a weakness, since he is about as complete a player as you’ll get in the draft. His shot is unconventional, but it works well for him, and he can beat goaltenders from all over the ice at the Junior level. The concern is whether his offensive skill set will translate to the NHL in a manner commensurate with the expectations placed on a first overall pick. - Matt Drake, Eyes on the Prize

Highlights